CNC Controller Market and its Key Opportunities and Challenges

The global CNC controller market size was valued at USD 2.9 billion in 2016 and is expected to reach the level of USD 3.7 billion by 2023 with a  CAGR of 3.8%. An increase in the adoption of industrial automation in the manufacturing sector, the ability to reduce operating costs, and rising demand for mass production across end-user industries are the key factors driving the growth of the CNC controller market. Growing industrial automation adoption in the manufacturing sector and increasing demand for mass production across end-user industries are key drivers of this market’s growth. Major entry and growth barrier for CNC market is a requirement of high investment cost for the implementation of CNC machines. CNC machining center accounted for the largest share of the global controller market in 2017. They are used for a wide range of applications. Machining processes such as drilling, milling, boring, and tapping, and which were done traditionally on conventional machine tools, can be done more efficiently with the help of CNC machining centers. Further, it helps in continuous production work, owing to which they hold a significant share of the global CNC controller market. 3-a...

Prototyping PCBs with Electrical Discharge Machining

Here at Hackaday, we thought we’d seen every method of making PCBs: CNC machining, masking and etching with a variety of chemicals, laser engraving, or even the crude but effective method of scratching away the copper with a utility knife. Whatever works is fine with us, really, but there still does seem to be room for improvement in the DIY PCB field. To whit, we present rapid PCB prototyping with electrical discharge machining. Using an electric arc to selectively ablate the copper cladding on a PCB seems like a great idea. At least that’s how it seemed to [Jake Wachlin] when he realized that the old trick of cutting a sheet of aluminum foil using a nine-volt battery and a pencil lead is really just a form of EDM, and that the layer of copper on a PCB is not a million miles different from foil. A few experiments with a bench power supply and a mechanical pencil lead showed that it’s relatively easy to blast the copper from a blank board, so [Jake] took the next logical step and rigged up an old 3D-printer to move the tool. The video below shows the setup and some early tests; it’s not perfect by a long shot, but it has a lot of promise. If he can control the arc better, this h...