Best Smart Light Switches That Don’t Require A Neutral Wire in 2020

Best answer: There are a lot of homes that were wired before the National Electric Code required every light switch junction box have a neutral wire. If you live in one, you’ll be faced with some obstacles should you decide to install smart switches in your wall. The good news is that there are smart switches you can use that don’t need a neutral wire. The bad news is that they all require the purchase of a second bridge or hub to get them “active” on your smart home network. There’s a reason why almost every smart switch needs a neutral wire attached: it needs to stay powered all the time. That’s what a neutral wire does (in this case); it allows the circuit to be completed and the switch to be powered when you have turned it to the off position to turn off a light. Without one, the circuit is broken when the switch is in the off position and powered when the switch is in the on position. This is because the neutral wire for the circuit is actually in the junction box that holds the light fixture, and the two wires coming down to the switch are the “hot” leg that will power the light. Smart switches that work without a neutral wir...

As they said in The Matrix, “We marveled at our own magnificence as we gave birth

As they said in The Matrix, “We marveled at our own magnificence as we gave birth to AI.”  Smart speakers have brought artificial intelligence (AI) into our homes in a way that was incomprehensible only a few years ago. The AI that is responsible for the voice recognition in these devices is amazing and has made it dramatically easier to control our smart homes. Note, that I said “control our smart homes.” For the most part, AI’s role in the smart home has simply been a new, and more convenient, way for people to control the devices in their home; using their voice. That is starting to change and for both integrators and homeowners there will be a dramatic transformation. Integrators can offer homeowners true automation of their smart homes that matches the way the homeowner uses their home. The smart home processor/hub can be programmed to, for example: But, all of the above requires a good programmer, who earns in excess of $100,000 per year, and therefore is very expensive to implement. The alternative is a smart home that learns how the homeowners use their home and takes actions that anticipate the homeowners’ needs. All this may sound like science-fiction but only a few y...